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add paragraphs on system requirements

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Sven Vermeulen 12 years ago
parent
commit
f20912e040
  1. 1
      ChangeLog
  2. 4
      TODO
  3. 47
      src/linux_sea/16-installgentoo.xml

1
ChangeLog

@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
** (2010-09-04) Sven Vermeulen <sven.vermeulen@siphos.be>
- Simple spellcheck
- Add in system requirement paragraph (especially disk space)
** (2010-09-03) Sven Vermeulen <sven.vermeulen@siphos.be>
- Elaborate a bit more on stage4/5 backup/restores

4
TODO

@ -1,7 +1,3 @@
spellcheck from ch07
install gentoo - start with information on minimum requirements like disk space and cpu and memory and ...
device management: elaborate on device names (if not already done)
shell scripting 101

47
src/linux_sea/16-installgentoo.xml

@ -22,6 +22,30 @@
Handbook</ulink>. There are also <ulink type=""
url="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook">handbooks</ulink> available
for other architectures.</para>
<section>
<title>System Requirements</title>
<para>Gentoo Linux can be as heavy as you want, or as small as you want.
Yet unless you deviate from the documented approach, Gentoo Linux
remains a source-based distribution. Because of that, it has a slightly
higher disk space requirement than other distributions. A minimal (base)
Gentoo Linux installation takes a little less than 2Gbyte of diskspace
(including Linux kernel source code and the Gentoo Portage tree, which
take about 640 Mbyte in total). But with 2Gbyte, you don't have room for
much more than a base installation.</para>
<para>To have a comfortable installation, yet with room to spare for
additional installations, you should consider a total diskspace of at
least 20 Gbyte for the applications alone. With current disk sizes, this
should not be a problem. If you don't install a full-blown KDE or GNOME,
you should have enough with 10Gbyte or less.</para>
<para>Disk space aside, Gentoo Linux can run and install with almost any
system specification. Of course, the lower the specs, the higher the
duration of an installation. Installing Gentoo Linux on a i486 with 32
Mbyte of memory is doable (but not recommended).</para>
</section>
</section>
<section>
@ -57,8 +81,7 @@
<para>First, mount all the necessary partitions onto your Linux
environment. In the rest of this chapter I will assume the partitioning
layout as described in <link
linkend="example_partitiontable">here</link>.</para>
layout as described inthe following table:</para>
<table id="example_partitiontable">
<title>Example partition layout</title>
@ -176,11 +199,11 @@
a Gentoo Linux variant which offers freshly-built Gentoo Linux stable
stages using Gentoo's official stable branch. You can use a funtoo stage
instead of a Gentoo official stage if you want. After all, they both
contain roughly the same material. However, some caution is still in place:
the Funtoo stages continuously evolve and diverge into their own set so I
recommend to take a quick stab at the Funtoo installation instructions
nevertheless. At the time of writing, the instructions are quite
resembling.</para>
contain roughly the same material. However, some caution is still in
place: the Funtoo stages continuously evolve and diverge into their own
set so I recommend to take a quick stab at the Funtoo installation
instructions nevertheless. At the time of writing, the instructions are
quite resembling.</para>
<para>Next, go back a few directories until you can select snapshots.
Enter this directory and download the latest
@ -366,11 +389,11 @@ de_DE@euro ISO-8859-15
none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0</programlisting>
<para>Next, configure your network settings. Start by setting the system
host name in <filename>/etc/conf.d/hostname</filename> and then configure
the networking settings in <filename>/etc/conf.d/net</filename>.
Finally, add your network interface initialization script to the default
run level so that networking is automatically started at boot
time.</para>
host name in <filename>/etc/conf.d/hostname</filename> and then
configure the networking settings in
<filename>/etc/conf.d/net</filename>. Finally, add your network
interface initialization script to the default run level so that
networking is automatically started at boot time.</para>
<programlisting>~# <command>nano -w /etc/conf.d/hostname</command>
~# <command>nano -w /etc/conf.d/net</command>