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Sven Vermeulen 12 years ago
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  1. 14
      src/linux_sea/19-shellscripting.xml

14
src/linux_sea/19-shellscripting.xml

@ -102,8 +102,8 @@ Try 'ls --help' for more information
<para>Well, the shell offers the <parameter>||</parameter> separator
to chain such commands. Its use is less pertinent in regular shell
operations, but more in shell scripts (for instance for error
handling). Yet, it is not unuseful for regular shell operations, as
the following example shows:</para>
handling). Yet, it is still useful for regular shell operations, as
the following (perhaps too simple, yet explanatory) example shows:</para>
<programlisting>~$ <command>mount /media/usb || sudo mount /media/usb</command></programlisting>
@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ dev-perl/libwww-perl-5.836
containing the string 'completed emerge'. The results of the
<command>grep</command> operation is then piped to the
<command>awk</command> application which prints out the 8th field
(where whitespace is a field separator), which is the category/package
(where white space is a field separator), which is the category/package
set. This allows you to follow a lengthy emerge process without having
to keep an eye on the entire output of
<command>emerge</command>.</para>
@ -223,7 +223,7 @@ dev-perl/libwww-perl-5.836
<title>Grouping Commands</title>
<para>Shells also offer a way to group commands. If you do this, it is
said that you create a subshell that contains the commands you want to
said that you create a sub-shell that contains the commands you want to
execute. Now why would this be interesting? </para>
<para>Well, suppose that you want to update your system, followed by an
@ -304,7 +304,7 @@ iptables -A FORWARD -o tap0 -i eth0 -d 192.168.100.1/24 ! -s 192.168.100.1/24 -j
<title>Documenting</title>
<para>You can easily document your steps in shell scripts. A comment
is prepended with #, like so:</para>
starts with #, like so:</para>
<programlisting># Load in virtualisation modules
modprobe tun
@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ modprobe tun
</para>
<para>First, make sure that we are root. We can verify this by reading
the special variable $UID (a readonly variable giving the user id of
the special variable $UID (a read-only variable giving the user id of
the user executing the script):</para>
<programlisting>#!/bin/bash
@ -478,7 +478,7 @@ Failed to load in module tun
<section>
<title>Want more?</title>
<para>This is as far as I want to go with a book targetting Linux
<para>This is as far as I want to go with a book targeting Linux
starters. You should now have enough luggage to make it through various
online resources and other books, and still have a reference at your
disposal for your day-to-day activities on your (Gentoo) Linux